FAQ

/FAQ

No, as default proxy server is deployed by the setup automatically. However, we recommend that you add additional ones for redundancy and load-balancing. For recommendations on where it is best to deploy additional proxies, please refer to the hypervisor-specific FAQ.

Because on-the-fly processing (deduplication and compression) of heavy data streams (hunreds of MB per second) requires significant CPU, Memory and I/O resources, physical proxy server suits best for 24/7 virtual environments with high consolidation ratio. Otherwise, you may find backup process affecting your production.

VM Copy jobs produce exact copies of selected VMs on the selected storage, and can be used for scenarios such as datacenter migrations, creating test labs, and ad-hoc backups. VM Copy jobs support processing of running VMs. Unlike backup job however, VM Copy does not support “incremental” runs. VM copy jobs are only supported for VMware VMs.

Replication jobs produce exact replicas of production VMs on standby hosts. These replicas can be powered on immediately when production VM goes down, without any dependencies on Veeam Backup and Replication server, and at full I/O performance. However, replicas require standby host, and more disk space than backups due to being stored in uncompressed, native format. Thus, replica are typically used for tier 1 VMs with low recovery time objectives.

Backup Copy jobs efficiently create copies of your backups both on-site (usually for archival purposes) and off-site (to meet the off-site backup storage requirement). Maintaining multiple copies of your backups, with some of them being off-site is dictated by industry best practice known as 3-2-1 backup rule: at least 3 copies of production data (1 production and 2 backups), with backups stored on 2 different media types, and 1 of them stored off-site.

The following repositories are supported:
• Any storage directly attached to a Microsoft Windows server (Windows XP or later, both x86 and x64 supported). The storage can be local disks, directly attached disk based storage (such as USB hard drive), or a iSCSI/FC SAN LUN in case the server is connected into the SAN fabric.
• Any storage directly attached to, or mounted on a Linux server (x86 and x64 of all major distributions are supported, must have SSH and Perl installed). The storage can be local disks, directly attached disk based storage (such as USB hard drive), NFS share, or iSCSI/FC SAN LUN in case the server is connected into the SAN fabric.
• CIFS (SMB) share. Password authentication is supported. Data can be written to CIFS share directly from the backup proxy server, or through secondary backup proxy server (useful in cases when CIFS share is located in the remote site).

No, we leverage default VSS provider from Microsoft that is already available on each Windows guest.

Group similar VMs (such as VMs with the same operating system, or VMs made from the same template) in the same job. Have fewer jobs with more VMs in each, rather more jobs with fewer VMs in each.

No, we recommend that you keep it enabled for better results! You will get faster backups, and more portable backup files. However, consider disabling compression, because compression may affect deduplicating ratio significantly on these type of storage devices.

No, because replicas are created in native format (uncompressed), deduplication is not applicable to them.

Veeam performs agent-less, block-level, inline (on-the-fly) deduplication. Deduplication happens both at source (before data is sent to backup storage, which significantly improves incremental backup performance), as well as target (to achieve additional reduction for jobs with multiple VMs).

Free ESXi is not supported, because it has vStorage API for Data Protection and other management APIs locked down specifically to prevent ISVs from being able to backup/manage such hosts.

Starting with version 7.0 patch 4, Veeam Backup & Replication supports automatic license update. With this feature enabled, Veeam backup server (or Veeam Backup Enterprise Manager server, if deployed) proactively communicates with Veeam licensing portal to receive a new license before the current license expires. For more information on how to enable this feature please review the Veeam Backup & Replication

Problem

You get the following error in the backup copy job in the Veeam Backup and Replication console: Cloud repository {NAME} is unavailable due to the service provider restriction

Solution

  1. Open the Veeam Backup and Replication console
  2. Select “Backup Infrastructure”
  3. Select “Service Providers”
  4. Right click your TrueNet service provider and select “Rescan…”
  5. Right click your backup copy job and select “Sync Now”

IMAP is a newer protocol that keeps all messages and folders on the server. In addition, IMAP idle is an optional feature of the IMAP protocol that pushes all new messages to Outlook as they are received by the mail server. Unlike POP, IMAP offers two-way communication between your SmarterMail mailbox and your email client(s). This means when you log in to the SmarterMail Web interface, actions you performed on email clients and mobile devices will automatically appear in the Web interface (and vice versa).

With POP3, your mail is saved in a mailbox on the remote server until you check your mail. When you check your mail, all of the mail is downloaded to your computer and is no longer maintained on the server. If you use POP3 and are traveling or checking your mail from multiple locations, you will not be able to view any of your old mail because the messages only exist on the computer on which you originally received your mail. NOTE: If you have enabled Outlook to keep messages on the server, you will be able to access your messages and folders from any computer via the SmarterMail Web interface or your mobile device.

Follow these steps to create an Outlook 2010 POP3 or IMAP account:

  1. In Outlook, go to File, Click the Info tab
  2. Click Add Account
  3. Click Manually configure server settings or additional server types radio button.
  4. Click Next.
  5. Click the Internet Email radio button.
  6. Click Next.
  7. Enter the following information:
    • Your Name:
    • Email address:
    • Incoming Server:
    • Outgoing Mail server:
    • User name:
    • Password:
  8. Click Next.
  9. If your mail server requires SMTP Authentication, follow these steps. If you are not sure if your mail server requires SMTP Authentication, please contact your hosting company or ISP.
    • Click on More Settings.
    • Navigate to Outgoing Server Tab
    • Check “My Outgoing Server requires SMTP Authentication”.
    • Click OK.
  10. Click Next.
  11. Click Finish.

IMAP is a protocol that keeps all messages and folders on the server. In addition, IMAP idle is an optional feature of the IMAP protocol that pushes all new messages to Outlook as they are received by the mail server. Unlike POP, IMAP offers two-way communication between your SmarterMail mailbox and your email client(s). This means when you log in to the SmarterMail Web interface, actions you performed on email clients and mobile devices will automatically appear in the Web interface (and vice versa).

With POP3, your mail is saved in a mailbox on the remote server until you check your mail. When you check your mail, all of the mail is downloaded to your computer and is no longer maintained on the server. If you use POP3 and are traveling or check your mail from multiple locations, you will not be able to view any of your old mail because the messages only exist on the computer on which you originally received your mail. NOTE: If you have enabled Outlook to keep messages on the server, you will be able to access your messages and folders from any computer via the SmarterMail Web interface or your mobile device.

Follow these steps to create an Outlook 2007 POP3 or IMAP account:

  1. In Outlook, go to Tools and Account Settings. Below the Email tab click New.
  2. Choose the email service you wish to configure: POP3 or IMAP.
  3. Select the manually configure server settings or additional server types check box. This will automatically enter in all of the required fields.
  4. Click Next.
  5. Click the Internet Email bubble.
  6. Click Next.
  7. Enter the following information:
    • Your Name: This is the display you want to use, such as Joe Smith.
    • Email Address: This is your full email address, such as username@example.com.
    • Incoming Server: Contact your ISP or hosting company for this setting. It will be something like mail.example.com.
    • Outgoing Mail Server: Contact your ISP or hosting company for this setting. It will be something like mail.example.com.
    • Username: This is your full email address, such as username@example.com.
    • Password: This is your email account password.
  8. If your mail server requires SMTP authentication, follow these steps. If you are not sure if your mail server requires SMTP authentication, please contact your hosting company or ISP.
    • Click More Settings.
    • Navigate to the Outgoing Server tab
    • Select the My Outgoing Server requires SMTP Authentication checkbox.
    • Click OK.
  9. Click Next.
  10. Click Finish.

What is 95th percentile billing?

95th Percentile or ‘Burst-able’ billing is a method of measuring bandwidth based on peak use. It allows usage to exceed a specified threshold for brief periods of time without the financial penalty of purchasing a higher Committed Rate.

Bandwidth is measured from the customer’s switch port and recorded in a log file every 5 minutes. At the end of the month, the top 5% of these data points are not used when calculating the billable utilization. This is equivalent to 36 hours per month:

• There are 1440 minutes in a day. 1440 / 5 minute increments = 288 data points per day.
• Given 288 data points per day, 288 x 30 days = 8640 data points per month.
• The top %5 of these data points are thrown out. 8640 x .05 = 432 data points.
• 432 x 5 minute increments = 2160 Minutes (or 36 hours) per month that are thrown out.

The next highest measurement becomes the ‘billable utilization’ for the month. This method will
allow brief access to peak bandwidth when required.

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Can you provide an example of the of 95th percentile billing in action?

If a customer that has committed to 100 Mbps requires the ability to burst to 1000 Mbps, but doesn’t want the financial burden of paying for extra bandwidth when they are not using it, then 95th percentile billing is the ideal solution.

For example: A company hosted by TrueNet issues a press release that lands them on the front page of several prominent tech websites, which pushes the traffic over their commit rate for 30 hours. As a result, 360 (30 hours x 60 minutes / 5 minute increments) of this customer’s 8640 monthly data points are above the 100 Mbps paid limit. Because the 360 data points are included within the top 5% threshold that is not used to calculate the billable utilization, there would be no financial penalty incurred.
How much does 1Mbps of transfer equal (in terms of physical transfer)?

A customer that saturates 1 Mbps (megabit per second, or Mb/s) for a month would be transferring about 300 GB. If a customer has 5 Mbps with their account, it would be the equivalent transfer of roughly 1.5 TB. This is quite a lot of transfer!

A domain name, a series of textual characters that identifies a specific IP address, uniquely identifies a website on the Internet. Domain names locate businesses, organizations, or other entities on the Internet. Domain names are easy to remember, easy to type alternatives to obscure URL’s that you receive with free website hosting services. Using a domain name allows you to receive more visitors, less bounced emails, and the chance to make a lasting impression on the Web.

A great benefit of using your domain name is that regardless of how many times you change your access provider, your Email and website address will always remain the same.

Yes. Our facility has a redundant N+1 cooling system powered by our two 20 ton Liebert units that are balanced and control by our Liebert AC4 control unit.